Welcome to the IAH Podcast Series, where we profile fascinating people connected to the Institute for the Arts and Humanities at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. We talk with faculty about the pillars of their work in teaching, service and research. We learn the makings of successful leaders across disciplines. And we share this with you.

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Nelson Schwab III, IAH Advisory Board Chair

Nelson Schwab

Nelson Schwab III (’67) discusses his days at Carolina and why it is so important to support faculty for the university’s continued success. “IAH Founder Ruel Tyson’s vision was to create something that would support and foster really good professors… The better prepared, the better trained, the happier the professors are here, the better off the experience will be for the students. It creates a great learning environment. I just thought that made sense.”


Morgan Pitelka, Associate Professor Asian Studies

Morgan Pitelka

Morgan Pitelka’s parents had a big influence in his scholarship. his father was a potter so he became interested in

He discusses his love of Japanese film, particularly, the work of Hidden Fortress was the inspiration for Star Wars.

 


Spring 2017 Highlights

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Communications Specialist M. Clay and Coordinator for Faculty Programs Philip Hollingsworth share highlights from their favorite podcasts.


Beverly Taylor, Professor of English

Beverly Taylor, Institute for the Arts and Humanities

Beverly Taylor discusses her road to her life of research on poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning. “Feminist scholars in the 1960s and 1970s uncovered the feminist and abolitionist politics in Barrett Browning’s poetry. Taylor also talks about how the book To Kill a Mockingbird served as a lesson on teaching in Mississippi in 1969.


Molly Worthen, Assistant Professor of History

Before becoming an academic, Molly Worthen worked as a journalist. She brings this sensibility to her work as a scholar. She also writes a regular column for the New York Times Opinion Section. She describes her work in exploring Christianity in the United States.

 


Gabriel Trop, Associate Professor, German Studies

Gabriel Trop, Institute for the Arts and Humanities

Gabriel Trop discusses how philosophy and literature led him to the scholarship of German aesthetics, especially the one professor who inspired and challenged him. He branched out to study the Classics to better understand German poets and philosophers, such as Hölderlin, Novalis, Brockes, Hagedorn, and Gleim. During his Faculty Fellowship he works on a project exploring attraction and indifference.


Tanya Shields, Associate Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies

Tanya Shields Institute for the Arts and Humanities

Tanya Shields is an Academic Leadership Program Fellow and director of undergraduate studies in her department. She discusses her latest work as dramaturge for the production of Plantation Remix at Houston-based Progress Theater. “The trauma and violence that people tour and enjoy, they want to disrupt that.” She is “helping build the context for the structure of the play as an advisor to the playwright. I am also learning how a play is created.”

 


Terry Rhodes, Professor and Senior Associate Dean for Fine Arts and Humanities

Terry Rhodes

Terry Rhodes oversees all departments and programs in the divisions of fine arts and humanities, and assists in the recruitment, development, and retention of faculty in those divisions. Especially known for her work in contemporary music, she has served on the music faculty since 1987 as UNC Opera Director and a member of the voice faculty, and as departmental chair from 2009–2012. She discusses how music played an integral part in her growing up.


Leon Botstein, Bard College President, 2017 Reckford Lecturer

Leon Botstein

American Symphony Orchestra Conductor and Bard College President Leon Botstein delivered the 23rd annual Mary Stevens Reckford Lecture in European Studies entitled, “Sounding Forms: What Music and Its Practice Reveals Abotu Modern European History.”


Jane Brown and Pat Pukkila, Retired Faculty Program Co-Facilitators

Old Well

Jane Brown, is Professor Emerita in the School of Media and Journalism, former Chair of the Faculty, a Faculty Fellow and part of the inaugural Academic Leadership Program cohort and also Academic Leadership Program facilitator. Pat Pukkila is Professor Emerita in the Biology Department and founding director of the Office for Undergraduate Research. They discuss how the pilot Retired Faculty Program has taken off in providing this segment of Faculty with appreciation, purpose and community.


Kumarini Silva, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication

Kumarini Silva

Kumarini Silva, whose research is at the intersections of feminism, identity and identification, post-colonial studies, and popular culture, discusses race and gender in current politics. She also talks about her latest book Brown Threat: Identification in the Security State (2016). Silva  moderates the faculty event Difficult Conversations: Gender Equity in Higher Education.


Anna Hayes and Kim Church, Crooks Corner Book Prize

Kim Church

Anna Hayes, founder of the Crooks Corner Book Prize, discusses the local literature scene while author and 2015 Crooks Corner Prize winner Kim Church (pictured) reads from her book Byrd and talks about the writing process. Both were featured on the panel of the Emerging Writers Cafe at the Institute in December 2016.


Season 1 Highlights with Philip Hollingsworth and Melissa Clay

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Coordinator for Faculty Programs Philip Hollingsworth and Communications Specialist Melissa Clay discuss their favorite episodes since the beginning of the IAH Podcast Series in November 2015 in this retrospective. “When I think about our podcast, I think about the interesting things we learn about the faculty here at UNC,” says Clay. Academia has these “pillars of teaching, research and service and how do they get all of that done?”


Jina Valentine, Assistant Professor of Art

Jina Valentine

Jina Valentine is concerned with how art can inspire discussion. Black Lunch Table, a collaboration with fellow artists Hong-An Truong and Heather Hart, is a work of social-practice art that provides a discursive space for artists, activists, and community members to discuss critical issues. It began as a social experiment in 2005 with the question “what would happen if we segregated the lunch rooms. We are very interested in the conversations that happen at the lunch table,” said Valentine.


Jeannie Loeb, Senior Lecturer, Psychology and Neuroscience

Jeannie Loeb

During her Faculty Fellowship as a Chapman Family Teaching Award recipient, Jeannie Loeb worked on researching education strategies. She hopes to share her findings on best practices for organizing classes, communicating effectively, and keeping the class engaged. Loeb has a special interest in “students who are from populations which are struggling at universities: first-generation college students, transfer students and minority students.”


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