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Jeff Williams Presents: Contemporary American Fiction and Generation Jones

Jeff Williams of Carnegie Mellon University will deliver a lecture entitled "Contemporary American Fiction and Generation Jones" on Thursday, November 21 at 4:00 p.m. in Hyde Hall. This event is free and open to the public.

What
When Nov 21, 2013
from 04:00 PM to 06:00 PM
Where Hyde Hall Incubator Room
Contact Name
Contact Phone 962-6831
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Jeff Williams of Carnegie Mellon University will deliver a lecture entitled "Contemporary American Fiction and Generation Jones" on Thursday, November 21 at 4:00 p.m. in Hyde Hall. This event is free and open to the public.

In this lecture, Williams examines how we might understand contemporary American fiction in terms of generations. In particular, it uses the new sociological designation of "Generation Jones" to describe the cohort between sixties Baby Boomers and Generation X, a cohort that has become dominant in fiction as well as politics (Obama v. Clinton or Bush), and includes writers like Ellis, Franzen, Egan, Lee, Lethem, Powers, and Wolitzer. 

Jeff WilliamsJeff Williams is a cultural critic and professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University. He has examined cultural criticism in a range of essays, such as "The Posttheory Generation" and "The New Belletrism," as well as in a series of interviews, some of which are collected in Critics at Work: Interviews 1993-2003 (NYU, 2004). One aim of criticism that is a focus for Williams is the state of higher education, and he has written about the issue of student debt in "Debt Education" and "Student Debt and the Spirit of Indenture," both in Dissent (he also contributes to Dissent's "Arguing the World" blog). Another focus has been on academic life itself, and he is currently completing a book on The Academic Condition, which includes essays on "Smart" and "Academostars." He also has written about the history of the novel in Theory and the Novel: Reflexivity in the British Tradition (Cambridge, 1998), and on contemporary fiction. He is an editor of The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism (2nd ed. 2010), the longtime editor of the journal Minnesota Review, and editor of the collections The Institution of Literature (SUNY, 2002) and PC Wars: Politics and Theory in the Academy (Routledge, 1995).